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angeles daily news." that is all for the program, thank you for joining us. we will now go to the senate homeland security and government affairs committee where chairman lieberman is going to be hosting a meeting about the ongoing threats. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . >> i was struck yesterday by reading a gallup poll in one of the newspapers that showed a significant decrease in concern about terrorism among the american people. now, this is understandable, particularly because of the stress that current economic conditions have put so many american families under, but as the three witnesses know very well, the threat is still all too real. our committee knows that as well. it's our job and yours to be focused on protecting our homeland and our people from violent extremist and terrorists no matter what the state of public opinion is about it at the moment, and that's why, of course, we are so happy that -- and grateful that you are here today. the tragedy of 9/11 is a daily reality for the three of y
with the till look -- tillamook burn. never. we used to have a very high rate of employment, with a relatively high average, annual salary when the mills were operating. we no longer have mills. what in the hell are we doign to this -- doing to this state? >> do you want to share any thoughts on the east side forest plan my colleague has been trying to put together to get out of this deadlock? >> it all works soemtimes. -- sometimes. but every time that something gets going, it goes to the courts. we are stymied. >> thank you very much. whenever i am hiding in that area, you often see -- hiking in that area, you often see completely overgrown, second- growth forests that are not serving their purpose and are often a source of disease, a potential fire hazard. it is a lose-lose-lose situation. there are a number of things that we need to push forward on. one is the thinning which produces a steady supply of logs, better timber stands, and improves the ecosystem. nothing moves past in this world, but another piece was -- senator wyden and i thought to get money to help for us to thinning. a seco
the u.s. has blundrd into the scenario with one overreaction or another. bin laden needs to be the object of our hoss tilts, national security and contempt and deserves to be taken seriously. but most of what he has achieved we do ourselves. bin laden does not deserve that we even inadvertently fuffleful unimagined dreams. here's more from the president friday at this news conference. i think in this day and age there is always going to be the potential for an individual or a small group of individuals, if they are willing to die, to kill other people. some of them are going to be very well organized and some of them are going to be random. that threat is there and it's important, i think, for the american people to understand that and not to live in fear. it's just a reality of today's world that there are going to be threats out there. we have i think greatly improved our homeland security security since 9/11 occurred. you know, i am constantly impressed with the dedication that our teams apply to this problem. they are chasing down every threat, not just from al qaeda
that were donated to us. these were original patents that were provided. some of them date back to the early 1800's. is a reminder of what makes this country so great, our inventiveness. are originally there were a bunch of plates up there and i decided i have the whole plate room so i don't need another one year. >> do you have but george washington year? >> i kept george washington, i have a brown blanket. this was donated by steven spielberg to the -- i have abraham lincoln. this was donated by steven spielberg to a bill clinton. it is by norman rockwell. you have these guys cleaning the torch. it is a reminder that we constantly have to renew the flames of our democracy. >> when people come in this room, how do you notice them react? >> well, you know, somebody said this is the greatest home court advantage you have in this office. i think people feel a certain reverence for this space, because it symbolizes the presidency and it symbolizes what has been extraordinary record of tough tough decision -- of tough decisions and monumental decisions made in this room. usually people have a bi
religion within america is part of an exclusive club. this exploitation of the truth that is used for political purposes since this is now an election year, and the fact is, most americans are the easiest targets. they are an easy punching bag. we do not have the reach. we do not have a lobby. we do not have a p r infrastructure. the other side obviously has the microphone. my mentor always said something that is very telling for us as muslims as well as for americans and people. the world is not divided into muslims, christians, and jews. the world is divided into stupid people and intelligent people. >> on that note, who wants to be the first u.s. question? [laughter] raise your hand and we will have the gentleman with the microphone, for. >> we've discussed this in the past. while we know that the great majority of muslims embrace and endorse the founding principles of the united states and want to be good americans, unfortunately there are people who do not. they profess to be acting in the name of islam. one of the difficulties it seems to me is that there's no central author
. >> in a few moments, and news conference on the u.s. attitudes towards muslims protocol in an hour, the state department briefing that included questions on plans to burn copies of the qur'an. -- poor run -- koran. . . >> we meet today to discuss what we consider to be an alarming trend and a rise in the bigotry in this country. it is the time that challenges americans to decide whether we are going to live up to our values, the values of religious freedom and tolerance that has been the hallmark of american society for so long. i feel very privileged and honored to have such distinguished faith leaders com heree today -- come today to assert their belief in the importance of filling the american promise and these principles. i am particularly grateful to my jewish colleagues who are very busy, entering a time of jewish holy days and have many things to do in preparation for that. i am very grateful for them, in particular, for joining us today. let me just say a few brief words about the climate that we find ourselves in today. i understand that there is a great deal of misunderstanding abou
spurred that the national and local level the u.s. will lose. what do you think? the numbers to call -- you can also e-mail us. and we are on twitter. "curb corruption or lose the war" from "the wall street journal." the author of "why vietnam matters. " he draws on his own experience in vietnam. he starts out by saying -- so, what do you think? curb corruption or losing the war? will that be putting the american effort in jeopardy in afghanistan? "the wall street journal" has this piece. the piece says -- our question for you this morning, is there a danger in the u.s. losing the war in afghanistan do to problems of corruption, and bought more perhaps by the cia, trying to do the right thing and aligning itself with informants, but did they take advantage of the system? "the washington post" has an excerpt modified from "obama's wars." uc and in this year, president obama visiting arlington national -- you see in this here, president obama visiting arlington national cemetery. the peace in "the washington post" says -- so, we are seeing a little bit of the behind-the-scenes give- an
" reporter andrew zajac. and a discussion on the u.s. labor market with economist j. bradford delong. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] caller: caller: caller: caller: caller: host: general petraeus, secretary clayton -- glenn beck, among others, agreed that the dove out of reach center should not burn at the koran on the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. now we want your opinion whether you see it as a free-speech issue or not. you can see the numbers on the screen this morning. for the first 45 minutes we will be talking about this and going through the newspapers. you can also send us a tweak to -- tweet, tweet certification.com -- twitter.com/c-span-wj. here are a couple of articles about this. it has become headlines everywhere. u.s. embassies brace for karan burning protests. this is from the associated press. governor andate's u.s. embassies around the world preparing. from "the washington examiner" newspaper here in washington -- again, that is in "the washington
're document, and engaging in a discussion. here are the phone numbers. if you are a democrat, join us. rep conditions, join us, and independents, join us. good morning once again, this is the kind of discussion i can promise you would only happen on c-span. 34 years ago we used to call us the place where the constitution came to live every day, because it gave you a running example of the three branches of government and the live coverage of the congress, executive branch and what we told you about the supreme court so we couldn't let constitution day go by without a discussion. seems like we're hearing more and more about it these days, and on the front page of the washington times in a story about constitution day, david eisner who runs the national constitution center in philadelphia explains why. here is the story. he writes -- the tea party has got people thinking more seriously about what's in the constitution and what's not. that's the quote from the political analyst with american enterprise institute but they say it would be wrong to assume tea party movement was -- >> supreme cou
-- they should have enough capital to cover all of their losses. host: ok, thank you. republican line. calling us from los angeles, at an early hour. caller: i wanted to comment. i don't think the government should help any firm, and there are no firms that are too large to fail. there are perfect bankruptcy laws that are printed on the books. we just have to let the strongest firms survive and those of that for some reason cannot maintain their costs, you have to let them go. we cannot interfere with our market system. host: thank you for your call. i mentioned about candidates. some candidates picking up on this theme. here is just one example. cathy rodgers, washington's fifth congressional district. on her website, she has a series of pledges should see is putting forward. no. 5, reversed the wall street bailout. saying she had voted against the $700 billion tarp the bill and now our goal should be to make sure something like tarp never happens again. no company is too big to fail. the only thing to big to fail as america itself. one candidate picking up on this theme of bailouts. let us go n
minutes november? if you want to weigh in via e-mail as well, you can do so. and if you want to use twitter. again, we take our focus for the 45 minutes for the front page story in the "wall street journal" this morning. taking a look at political story with speaker pelosi. this is out of washington. they write so it talks about the political journey that will take, the paper talks more about that. but for our 45 minutes we're using this as a springboard to hear from democrats only. we'll take e-mail and twitter affouf this question, too. one more section from the interior pages of the same story. the writers write this morning. so the numbers will be on your screen. to your calls looking at speaker pelosi this november. portland, yorle, on -- oregon, on our line who thinks she will help. caller: i think nancy pelosi has been consistent and correct in her political decisions. i think she is definitely good for the country. and we small -- small african american community are very strong supporters. i think that the media is kind of hyped up all the predictions about shrinking democr
for the evening are here with us. let's get to it. josh, first question. mr. binnie, first response. >> we're here to talk about the issues. the tone of this race has become an issue. a lot of people say it has been one of the nastiest primary races in recent memory in new hampshire. where do you draw the line between an honest critique -- of their critique of your opponents background and nasty campaigning? >> it is a pleasure to be here tonight. it has been my pleasure to run for the united states senate. the people of new hampshire have gotten to know me. my dad introduced me over nine months ago. folks understand that i care about the job and the economy. when i became the frontrunner in the august, we were attacked by all kinds of private organizations. i thought that was not fair. i did not like it. not for amnesty. i am a liberal. ask my kids. what i am about is talking and dealing with the economic crisis that new hampshire is experiencing. we need jobs in our state. that is what i want to talk about. they do not care about these ads. they want to hear our policies and our background and h
. that is a desperately important process. every single shipper who uses a road is affected by whether this is a fair system or not. that lie in your hands. and hours. i will keep at it. you will keep at it. i'm glad you were there. fairness is fairness and that is what makes america work. with that unique statement, i will adjourn the hearing. but you both very much. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> there will be a forum on terror hosted by the american enterprise is to it -- institute at live coverage will start of 11:00 a.m. on c-span. ♪ >> this week on "q &a" our guest is warren brown. >> warren brown, you have written about automobiles for 30 years for the washington post." first question, how involved is the u.s. government in determining what we drive in this country? >> very involved from the regulatory the boy. you have safety and emissions controls and that sort of thing. most of those things are determined in terms of the goal of reaching an emissions. , those things are determined by the fed
if they can find a job, and save that space for hardnd criminals that put us at risk. we cannot afford to how's these people. i mean, actually some of them live better than our poor. so i hope this is a turn and i hope other states will take this on. and i really love c-span. it's so important these days. thank you so much. host: thanks for the phone call. we'll keep talking about this. but first, we want to get a quick update about the afghanistan elections. joining us on the phone is paul tate, with reuters and the afghanistan bureau chief. mr. tate, if you could tell us about the headlines that we're seing in this morning. here's one of them. afghan vote marred by irregularities. guest: good morning. it's certainly true there have been thousands of irregularities, we're told, even before voting began. thousands of voter registration cards, ink that was meant to identify people as having voted could be washed off. we even found some kids with bottles of bleach standing outside polling stations showing voters how to wash the ink off. the counting will take a very, very long time. so we're no
to you about well this weekend, i have to go back to mississippi for a family reunion. >> give us a brief idea of what the book is about? >> the book is about the defection of 6 million african-americans from the south to the north, mid-west to the west. from 1915-1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this as i went in. i'll read it to you. everyday more migrants are coming no the cities to seek a better life for their children. >> i wrote this book thinking of any country. it's a movie about the last train home where they have 150 million migrant that's live in the city each year. i want to talk to you about what you have written in the front of your book by richard wright. >> who was he and why did you pick him? >> richard wright was one of the greatest novelists of the 20 j century. he was a migrant from mississippi to chicago. he was the son of a share cropper and always wanted to write. i set out in 1927 to get to chicago. he spent almost his entire career. almost everything he wrote had to do with understanding the migrant exper
experience in washington. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people that have become part of the larger whole, which was the defection of 6 million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and west from 1915, world war i until 1970. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this. i want to read it to you. every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a cheap source of labor booming cities and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens. do you have any idea what country that is? >> i am thinking the united states. i wrote this book with the idea that it would refer to almost every immigrant that crossed the atlantic or the pacific ocean in order to come here. >> it is the movie called "the last train home." they had 130 million migrants t
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)